"The chart shows the relative shares of national income captured by labor and capital in the U.S. from 1929 to the middle of 2012. As you can see, the last couple of decades have not been as kind to those who work for companies as to those who own them. Not nearly. Here’s Smithers’ explanation to Jon:
ANDREW SMITHERS: All output is for somebody’s benefit, either those who work for the firm (the labor share) or those who provide the capital (the profit share). Labor’s share has never been lower or the profit share higher. These shares of course add up to 100 percent, before the government has taxed both labor and capital.”

Via PBS NewsHour

"The chart shows the relative shares of national income captured by labor and capital in the U.S. from 1929 to the middle of 2012. As you can see, the last couple of decades have not been as kind to those who work for companies as to those who own them. Not nearly. Here’s Smithers’ explanation to Jon:

ANDREW SMITHERS: All output is for somebody’s benefit, either those who work for the firm (the labor share) or those who provide the capital (the profit share). Labor’s share has never been lower or the profit share higher. These shares of course add up to 100 percent, before the government has taxed both labor and capital.”

Via PBS NewsHour